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Frequently Asked Questions

 


 

What will I see?
One of the first things you'll see when you enter the N.C. Children's Hospital is a big weird gizmo - two stories tall and constantly in motion. The big weird gizmo - more properly called an "audio kinetic sculpture" - is a jumble of mechanical devices and rolling balls, and it makes strange sounds. Nearby, there are lights on the wall in the lobby that change color as you are looking at them. You will also see signs to help you find your way. You will see a lot of bright colors, sculptures and fun artwork. You will also see a lot of people. Many people work in the hospital and they're all here to help you. Some people will bring you food on a tray, some will clean your room, some will listen to your heart, and some will write things down on charts. All of them will be working to help you get better and most of them will ask you questions. You might even see a teacher who will help you with your schoolwork.

 

How will I feel?
Some children feel like staying in bed and getting a lot of rest. Some children feel like playing. Some children feel like eating and others don't. Some children feel like doing what they do at home and some don't. Whatever you feel like is okay. Every person feels differently and wants to do different things. However you feel, we do our best to help you feel better and feel as comfortable as possible.

 

What is there to play with?
Sometimes you may play in your room, watch TV or movies on the VCR. Other times you may want to go to the play areas. The play atrium on the 7th floor has lots of toys and games for all ages. It has trees that have lights in the branches. There are things to climb and a bridge to play on. There is a rocky stream painted on the rubber-foam floor and big windows that allow for lots of light. The recreation area also includes a teen activity center, with Internet access, video games, a large screen TV and a computer. The teens can shoot hoops, toss the football and play air hockey or pool in the game room. Middle school kids can also use the game room during special hours. There is a music room that is set up with a karaoke machine so you can hear yourself sing. There are also instruments in this room in case you want to play a musical instrument and it has a stereo setup.


Can I bring my toys?
Yes. Some children say it helps to make them feel better if they have a special toy, blanket, pillow or game from home. You may want to bring a stuffed animal, book or hand-held video game.

 

Can my friends come to visit?
In most cases, yes. Your friends can come visit during visiting hours. They can play with you in your room and may even get to go to the play atrium with you. If you have something contagious or if your friends are sick, then they should stay home. Please check with your nurse first.


What will my room look like?
You will have your own room and your own bathroom. There will be plenty of room for your family. You will have a TV, VCR, telephone and a fold-out couch so that one adult can stay overnight with you. Bring your favorite movies or watch some of the movies on Channel 40.

 

What will I wear?
Some patients wear hospital pajamas or gowns. Some patients bring their favorite pajamas and some wear clothes from home. You can even bring your own slippers from home.


Will my parents or grandparents know what's happening to me?
Yes! Your parents and grandparents will be able to help the other people in the hospital-called your hospital team-take care of you. They can visit you and one adult can stay in your room with you at night. They will be able to tell your hospital team what you like and don't like because they know you better than anyone else. Your hospital team has special training that helps them figure out what to do to make you feel better. They can talk to your parents and grandparents about what to do to make you more comfortable.


What about my school work?
There is a school in the hospital with teachers and a principal. They can check with your teacher back home and figure out what lessons you need to learn. Every day you that you attend the hospital school counts on your attendance. That way you might not have to miss a lot of school. You can have your parent ask the nurse about it once you get to the hospital. Your main job in the hospital is to feel better, but if you feel okay then you might get to go to the hospital school.

 

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